Researchers develop blood cell test to see if you will die in the next 5-years

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Researchers In Finland And Estonia using blood cell tests to see you if you’re going to die in the next 5-years

By John Vibes

FINLAND (INTELLIHUB) — A team of researchers are claiming to have the ability to predict whether or not someone is at risk of dying from natural causes within the next 5-years.

Researchers from Finland and Estonia have discovered how to read certain biological markers, which they say can tell us someone’s risk of death.

The researchers are said to be using biological markers to help detect risk factors.

According to the study:

A biomarker is a biological molecule found in blood, body fluids, or tissues that may signal an abnormal process, a condition, or a disease. The level of a particular biomarker may indicate a patient’s risk of disease, or likely response to a treatment. For example, cholesterol levels are measured to assess the risk of heart disease. Most current biomarkers are used to test an individual’s risk of developing a specific condition. There are none that accurately assess whether a person is at risk of ill-health generally, or likely to die soon from a disease. Early and accurate identification of people who appear healthy but in fact have an underlying serious illness would provide valuable opportunities for preventative treatment.

While most tests measure the levels of a specific biomarker, there are some technologies that allow blood samples to be screened for a wide range of biomarkers. These include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These tools have the potential to be used to screen the general population for a range of different biomarkers.

The measures did not include common risk factors such as age, smoking, drinking, obesity, blood pressure and cholesterol. The result did not change even when only apparently healthy persons were examined.

“What is especially interesting is that these biomarkers reflect the risk of dying from very different types of diseases such as heart disease or cancer,” the University of Helsinki’s Johannes Kettunen, a lead author of the study, said in a statement. “Next, we aim to study whether some kind of connecting factor between these biomarkers can be identified.”

The research was conducted in collaboration between the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, and Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, University of Oulu, University of Eastern Finland, and the Estonian Biobank.

Writer Bio:

(Photo: Intellihub.com)

John Vibes is an investigative journalist, staff writer and editor for Intellihub News where this article originally appeared. He is also the author of an 90 chapter Book entitled “Alchemy of the Timeless Renaissance” and is an artist with an established record label. You can find him on his Facebook.
For media inquires, interviews, questions or suggestions for this author, email: vibes@intellihub.com or telephone: (347) 759-6075.
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