Army’s new truck-mounted laser can zap airborne drones and mortar shells

Intellihub.com

While the year is only 2013, technology is advancing rapidly. And yes ladies and gentlemen, laser weapons do exist

(Image: MilitaryAerospace.com)
(Image: MilitaryAerospace.com)

In true sci-fi fashion, the U.S. Army has successfully tested a truck-mounted portable laser weapon known as the High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator or HEL MD, capable of downing drone aircraft and deflecting mortar shelling.

ABC News reported:

Army video of the laser tests shows the laser targeting the mortar so that it burns up in mid-air and does not explode when it completes its trajectory.  ”We turn it into a rock, basically,” said Bauer.

Large test drones flying 5 kilometers from the laser system were made to crash into the New Mexico desert by aiming the laser at the tail of the unmanned aircraft.  An infrared camera on the video captured how a small dot of light on the tail slowly grew in intensity, forcing the craft to lose navigational control.  The laser can also be used for less offensive purposes by dialing back its intensity to blind sensors aboard the drones.

Plans call for shrinking the size of the laser system while also boosting its strength to 50 kilowatts, and ultimately 100 kilowatts.   Shrinking its size will make it easier to mount on more mobile vehicles that can be used on the battlefield.  Increasing the wattage will allow the beam to hit faster-moving targets at greater distances and in a shorter amount of time.  For example,  a 100 kilowatt laser beam will be able to bring down a target in a tenth of the time it currently takes for a 10 kilowatt laser.

While the Army says the technology is about 10-years away from being used on the battlefield, it’s important to note that the technology exists and likely could be used in many ways, including a future false flag scenario or even a hit on a targeted individual (TI).

I mean if you really think about it, there is no better way to down an aircraft as likely there would be no trace. The tail section of an aircraft or other venerable points stand no match for the 10-KW laser weapon.

Side note to journalists traveling by air–remain vigilant!

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