H1N1: Human to Animal Now Confirmed

The Intellihub
By Shepard Ambellas
Feb. 15, 2011

In 2009 we saw the H1N1 flu surface with s massive push from vaccine companies to sell millions of doses of the very dangerous fast tracked vaccine.

Some researchers in the medical profession have stated that they believe the original 2009 strain of H1N1 to be a man made catalyst or primer for a secondary component to be triggered to mutate the strain into a much more deadly version (bio-weapon).

Others such as Jane Burgermeister have gone as far as to filed charges against this criminal syndicate, getting stone walled at every corner.

Large think tanks such as the Rand Corp. have been devising ways to vaccinate even more of the worlds population as outlined in this recently released document on the Rand Corp. website titled “Seasonal Flu Vaccination: Why Don’t More Americans Get It?

Some say older strains of the virus more than likely escaped the lab like this Paul Watson Joseph Article lays out:

Professor: Descendent Of H1N1 Virus “Accidentally” Released From Lab

Professor John Oxford stated that the strain of H1N1 that appeared in the 1970′s was “probably released accidentally from a laboratory, probably in northern China or just across the border in Russia, because everyone was experimenting with those viruses at the time in the lab.”

Oxford told NPR that he didn’t believe the release was malicious but came as a result of “some flu vaccine research that broke out of containment.”

Now a 6-year-old cat in Wisconsin has the H1N1 and the virus is spreading from humans to animals. Apparently, at this time, there are no reports of the virus spreading from animals to humans.

The following PR Newswire article is disturbing;

H1N1 Flu Confirmed in Wisconsin Cat

SCHAUMBURG, Ill., Feb. 14, 2011

PRNewswire-USNewswire

Laboratory tests today confirmed that a 6-year-old cat in Wisconsin contracted the H1N1 influenza virus, the first confirmed case of H1N1 in a U.S. pet since January 2010.

A second cat in the household tested negative after it also developed severe respiratory disease, although it is now presumed that it too had the virus. Both cats were euthanized after failing to respond to treatment.

The owner of the cats had been ill with flu-like symptoms prior to the cats’ illness and is believed to be the source of the infection.

In addition to humans and cats, this strain of H1N1 influenza virus has also been found in pigs, birds, ferrets and a dog. There have been no confirmed cases of pets passing the virus back to people.

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is reminding pet owners that some viruses can pass between people and animals, so this is not an altogether unexpected event. Pet owners should monitor their pets’ health very closely, no matter what type of animal, and visit a veterinarian if there are any signs of illness.