Military coup takes over Thailand, martial law remains in effect

All T.V. and radio stations throughout the country have been taken over by the military which is now broadcasting propaganda to the populace following a massive military coup d’état

By Shepard Ambellas

BANGKOK (INTELLIHUB) — Reports out of the area say that the military chief of Thailand announced Thursday in an address to the nation, that the country has been taken over via a military coup d’état. The situation, following the announcement of “martial law” by the military on Tuesday, is said to be serious and remains fluid.

Nighttime curfews have been imposed on all civilians, between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., as all-out power has been taken into the hands of the military.

According to reports, the country’s politicians, which were escorted about  by military personnel, could not come to an agreement Tuesday, giving the military a chance to act.

Moreover, all television and radio stations throughout the country were taken over and all social media has been suspended. Military propaganda is now being aired on all formats, telling people to “conduct business as usual” and to not be “alarmed”.

CNN reported just how this all unfolded:

Thailand has been hit by bouts of political unrest over the past decade.

The current wave was triggered in November by Yingluck’s botched attempt to pass an amnesty bill that would have allowed the return of her brother Thaksin Shinawatra, another former prime minister who lives in exile. A military coup deposed Thaksin in 2006.

Groups opposed to the government seized on the amnesty bill furor and began large-scale protests in central areas of Bangkok.

In an attempt to defuse tensions, Yingluck called early elections. But the Democrat Party boycotted the February election, and Yingluck’s opponents blocked voting in enough districts to prevent a valid outcome.

According to some reports, the locals are handling the situation well and business is being normally conducted in Bangkok. In fact, some city folk even embraced the decision. According to Al Jazeera:

“If it stops the fighting it’s a good thing,” Kamonwan Puansrimuang, a 35-year-old teacher, said.

Others were more cautious. “I’m not sure about the reason behind this martial law and don’t know how it will make things better,” said 23-year-old office worker Chanantorn Fai. “I don’t think that it will bring real peace anyway. I can’t make any sense of what’s happening.”

She was not alone. “Nobody really knows how to read this one,” said David Streckfuss, an independent analyst based in the northern city of Khon Kaen, a government stronghold. “There is no justification for it. It’s hard to make any sense of it.”

However, the scene was much more frightening to some. Thomas Fuller, writing for the New York Times detailed the terror some felt:

In the first few hours, nobody knew exactly what to make of the declaration, which gives the military broad powers to disperse and arrest protesters, censor the news media and control many government functions.

Military vehicles and armed soldiers took positions on Bangkok streets, some television stations closed, and the military issued a warning against provocative comments on social media.

Yet, in many neighborhoods, not a soldier could be seen. Workplaces and schools remained open, people shopped, the stock market closed the day 1 percent lower and traffic backed up as it would have on any other workday. Tourists could be seen snapping photographs with smiling soldiers.

At this time it is unknown how the situation will progress.

This will mark the 11th coup staged by the Thai military in the last 80-years, as reported by the Washington Post Thursday.

(Image:YouTube)

About the author:
Ambellas, Shepard - Bio IconShepard Ambellas is the founder and editor-in-chief of Intellihub News and the maker of SHADE the Motion Picture. You can also find him on Twitter and Facebook. Shepard also appears on the Travel Channel series America Declassified.
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