MIT team pushing to develop offshore floating nuclear power plants

While technology add convenience, it can also be a duel-edged sword

By Shepard Ambellas

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (INTELLIHUB) — A Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) team, along with the insightful Jacopo Buongiorno, associate prof. of Nuclear Science and Eng., has been working hard with researchers to develop a new highly advanced “safer” type of commercial nuclear power reactor, a floating offshore nuclear power plant (FOSNPP).

While reports say that the reactors design is nothing new to other nations like Russia, the rather unique design is yet to be proven under real-world conditions.

In a recent presentation Buongiorno stated:

“The other key safety advantage is that because of distance from the shore.  Even if an accident should occur at the plant, it will not force people to evacuate, to move away from their homes and their jobs onshore.”

Buongiorno, continued on to talk about how the reactors will be “tsunami resistant”, hopefully preventing future Fukushima style onshore disasters.

However, skeptics claim that the plants will be hard to get approved by the regulatory commission.

In fact, Ryan Whitman writing for Geek reported:

The industry is interested in the prospect of building nuclear plants on the ocean because it’s likely to be far cheaper in addition to safer. Of course, nuclear power has a lot to prove before new plant designs are approved by regulatory agencies.

Sources:

[1] Floating Nuclear Plant Would Ride Out Tsunamis — Discovery.com

[2] MIT invents meltdown-proof floating nuclear reactor — Geek

Writer Bio:
Ambellas, Shepard - Bio IconShepard Ambellas is the founder and editor-in-chief of Intellihub News and the maker of SHADE the Motion Picture. You can also find him on Twitter and Facebook. Shepard also appears on the Travel Channel series America Declassified.
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