Private company to offer portable and private jet space weather and radiation detection units

(INTELLIHUB) — Frequent fliers may already know that while traveling on an airplane the human body absorbs a significant dose of radiation from the constant bombardment of cosmic rays at such a high-altitude.

Research shows that the human body will be exposed to as much radiation as a chest X-ray for every ten hours of flight time. And with atmospheric radiation levels on the rise, exposure may become a common concern amongst travelers.

Baffled scientists have recently found clouds in the sky in which they reported double the normal amount of radiation. In fact, just last week a U.S. Air Force WC-135 Constant Phoenix

In fact, just last week a U.S. Air Force WC-135 Constant Phoenix was dispatched over the skies of the United Kingdom to monitor and take samples of an oncoming radiation cloud which some have speculated may link to Russian nuclear weapons testing, possibly in Novaya Zemlya.

Norway was first to detect the approaching radioactive cloud in mid-January before “it was traced in Poland, Czech Republic, Germany, France and Spain,” as the WakefieldExpress reported on Friday.

But how do these newly discovered clouds affect travelers, pilots, and other airline workers frequently traversing the friendly skies?

A science project conducted by Space Environment Technologies, LLC and the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) suggests that space weather and radiation should be a major concern — not only for travelers — but for people who work in the airline industry.

According to the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Saftey (ARMAS) success story, “particles that make up space radiation may increase the risk of cancer development or other harmful effects.” So needless to say, people who embark on flights regularly may want to monitor space weather and possibly even track their personal radiation exposure with a dosimeter.

An excerpt from the two-page release states:

“Beginning in 2004, scientists at NASA Langley Research Center developed the NAIRAS model (Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System) as a space weather decision support tool designed to study radiation impacts on crew and passengers of long-range aircraft. This data would be used to change the schedule of flights and pilots accordingly, in order to keep their radiation doses below monthly and annual limits in the event of a solar storm. Looking to the future, NASA wanted to combine physics-based models with real-time measurements. So in 2011, when the agency put out a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) solicitation, it included a topic area for in situ airborne, surface and submersible instruments for Earth Science. A solution was proposed by California-based Space Environment Technologies that fit this objective – and the result was the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) Flight Module. ARMAS has evolved with the help of SBIR and is currently involved in a Phase III project with NASA, and is generating demand in the worldwide commercial aviation industry.”

Pilots and frequent flyers don’t always know current space weather conditions or if a solar event is underway. That’s why Space Environment Technologies, LLC developed the ARMAS flight module (now 6th Generation) which detects and relays space weather patterns along with radiation patterns and levels. The technology is aimed at keeping travelers as safe as possible from radiation while airborne.

The Wi-Fi enabled FM6 private jet unit are slated for release late-2017 and will run about $50,000.

Shepard Ambellas is an opinion journalist and the founder and editor-in-chief of Intellihub News & Politics (Intellihub.com). Shepard is also known for producing Shade: The Motion Picture (2013) and appearing on Travel Channel’s America Declassified (2013). Shepard is a regular contributor to Infowars. Read more from Shep’s World. Get the Podcast. Follow Shep on Facebook and Twitter.
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