Proof: Gun owners now tracked in database accessible by police

Ladies and gentlemen 1984 is already here as all gun owners are now fully tracked

By Shepard Ambellas

HUDSON (INTELLIHUB) — Concealed firearms license holder (CCW) and U.S. citizen John Filippidis keeps a gun around like most Americans do, for protection.

However, this past New Year’s eve Filippidis was headed south on I-95 with his wife Kally and their 3 daughters, minding his own business, unarmed, when he was pulled over by police officer who aggressively “flanked” them according to at least one report.

The officer, who was also said to have been previously bird-dogging them, followed Filippidis and his family, in their 2012 Ford Expedition, for 10 minutes before turning on his emergency lights, signaling Filippidis to pull over.

Tom Jackson of the Tampa Tribune writes about the event that took place that evening, detailing the actual encounter:

Finally the patrol car’s emergency lights come on, and it’s almost a relief. Whatever was going on, they’d be able to get it over with now. The officer — from the Transportation Authority Police, as it turns out, Maryland’s version of the New York-New Jersey Port Authority — strolls up, does the license and registration bit, and returns to his car.

According to Kally and John (but not MTAP, which, pending investigation, could not comment), what happened next went like this:

Ten minutes later he’s back, and he wants John out of the Expedition. Retreating to the space between the SUV and the unmarked car, the officer orders John to hook his thumbs behind his back and spread his feet. “You own a gun,” the officer says. “Where is it?”

 “At home in my safe,” John answers.

 “Don’t move,” says the officer.

 Now he’s at the passenger’s window. “Your husband owns a gun,” he says. “Where is it?”

 First Kally says, “I don’t know.” Retelling it later she says, “And that’s all I should have said.” Instead, attempting to be helpful, she added, “Maybe in the glove [box]. Maybe in the console. I’m scared of it. I don’t want to have anything to do with it. I might shoot right through my foot.”

 The officer came back to John. “You’re a liar. You’re lying to me. Your family says you have it. Where is the gun? Tell me where it is and we can resolve this right now.”

 Of course, John couldn’t show him what didn’t exist, but Kally’s failure to corroborate John’s account, the officer would tell them later, was the probable cause that allowed him to summon backup — three marked cars joined the lineup along the I-95 shoulder — and empty the Expedition of riders, luggage, Christmas gifts, laundry bags; to pat down Kally and Yianni; to explore the engine compartment and probe inside door panels; and to separate and isolate the Filippidises in the back seats of the patrol cars.

 Ninety minutes later, or maybe it was two hours — “It felt like forever,” Kally says — no weapon found and their possessions repacked, the episode ended … with the officer writing out a warning for speeding 71 mph in a 55 mph zone.

 “All that time, he’s humiliating me in front of my family, making me feel like a criminal,” John says. “I’ve never been to prison, never declared bankruptcy, I pay my taxes, support my 20 employees’ families; I’ve never been in any kind of trouble.”

Shockingly, this bears proof that at least some gun owners in America have been entered into a database accessible on the local police level.

(Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Writer Bio:
Ambellas, Shepard - Bio IconShepard Ambellas is the founder and editor-in-chief of Intellihub News and the maker of SHADE the Motion Picture. You can also find him on Twitter and Facebook. Shepard also appears on the Travel Channel series America Declassified.
For media inquires, interviews, questions or suggestions for this author, email: shepard@intellihub.com or telephone: (347) 759-6075.
Visit Shepard’s blog here.