Putain’s 3rd Term a Monopoly of Power

By Shepard Ambellas
dev-test.intellihub.com
May 6, 2012

MOSCOW — More than 18,000 anti-Putin protestors took the streets in swarms to demonstrate the illegitimacy of Vladimir Putin as he made history as Russia’s new supreme dictator with a bold move jumping through hoops to grasp any star possible.

SMH.com.au reported;

More than 250 people have been detained after protesters clashed with riot police in Moscow on the eve of Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency.

Protesters pelted officers with beer bottles and rocks. Riot police responded with overwhelming force, beating the crowd with batons and dragging people into waiting vans, sometimes by the hair.

Among the detained were some of the protest movement’s main leaders – the anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny, the leftist activist Sergei Udaltsov and the former deputy prime minister Boris Nemtsov.

Russian law limits the president to two consecutive 6 year terms, showing Putin’s monopoly on power as he was inaugurated Monday at the Kremlin.

An RTT News excerpt reads;

Medvedev, who stepped down as President on Monday after four years in office, is set to take over from Putin as party chief next month.

After holding the Presidency for two consecutive terms from 2000 to 2008, Putin proposed his protege Medvedev as his successor for the 2008 presidential elections, since the country’s Constitution does not allow a President running for a third consecutive term.

Putin clearly found this loophole and will now hold office for a third presidential term.

However it was reported by AP;

Vladimir Putin has chosen the head of theInternational Olympics Committee for his first official meeting on the day he was sworn in as president.

Putin stated during the inauguration;

“The security of our citizens has always been my upmost priority. I will do my best to justify the trust of millions of you. It is my duty to serve our country and our people… this is a long and difficult road ahead we have to take together to make our country strong and restore our dignity.”

Putin has been at the helm of Russia for most of the protestors lives, as most are young.

Paul Whitefield writes;

One thing about the Russians — they like their strongmen. First the czars, then Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev and that lovable bear of a guy, Brezhnev.

OK, so Mikhail Gorbachev fell short of true strongmanship, and likewise Boris Yeltsin.  But the latter bequeathed us Putin, and the ex-KGB guy has proved more than capable at keeping himself in power.

Some of the general public said no other candidate would be suitable, settling for the new dictator inserted government puppet put into place by the global power structure.

RT reported;

Another report;