U.S.D.A. gears up for war against farmers, solicits sub-machine guns and body armor

After putting out solicitations for sub-machine guns and Level IIIA body armor, one must wonder what the U.S.D.A. is truly getting ready for

(INTELLIHUB) — After the recent armed standoff over cattle grazing rights, which took place at the Bundy Ranch in Nevada between common supporters of the U.S. Constitution and the Bureau of Land Management, the American public got a taste of what their beloved government is really willing to do and just how far they will actually go. Now some are questioning why the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture has put out active solicitations for sub-machine guns capable of firing 2-round-bursts and Level IIIA body armor, fearing a war against farmers.

According to the May 7 solicitation on FedBizOps.gov:

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of Inspector General, located in Washington, DC, pursuant to the authority of FAR Part 13, has a requirement for the commercial acquisition of submachine guns, .40 Cal. S&W, ambidextrous safety, semi-automatic or 2 shot burts trigger group, Tritium night sights for front and rear, rails for attachment of flashlight (front under fore grip) and scope (top rear), stock-collapsilbe or folding, magazine – 30 rd. capacity, sling, light weight, and oversized trigger guard for gloved operation.  NO SOLICITATION DOCUMENT EXISTS.  All responsible and/or interested sources may submit their company name, point of contact, and telephone.  If received timely, shall be considered by the agency for contact to determine weapon suitability.





Moreover on May 7, the U.S.D.A. put out a second solicitation requesting Level IIIA body armor in conduction with the sub-machine guns.

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The solicitation posted on FedBizOps.gov reads:

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of Inspector General, located in Washington, DC and Regional Offices, pursuant to the authority of FAR Part 13, has a requirement for the commerical acquisition of ballist vests, compliant with NIJ 0101.06 for Level IIIA Ballistic Resistance of body armor.  Body armor is gender specific, lightweight, trauma plate/pad (hard or soft), concealable carrier, tactical vest, undergarment (white), identification patches, accessories (6 pouches), body armor carry bag, and professional measurements.  NO SOLICITATION DOCUMENT EXISITS.  All responsible and/or interested sources may submit their company name, point of contact, and telephone number.  If received timely, shall be considered by the agency for contact.

Shockingly, the U.S.D.A. has been terrorizing farmers for years as the documentary film Farmageddon points out. A review of the film written by Gar Smith dated Sept. 25, 2011 reads:

The first-person stories related in Kristin Canty’s new documentary, Farmageddon, may sound like people recounting the post-trauma shock of a drug-raid but these “perps” are not pot-growers or drug-smugglers, they are family farmers and members of organic produce buying clubs. 

“I was at the top of the stairs and I saw a man with a gun pointed up at me. All I could see was a black hat and a black jacket. I stood there thinking this was a serial killer.” 

“They seized $64,000 worth of food and equipment. They terrorized the children. They took the farmer away in handcuffs.” 

“They showed up at 5:30 in the morning in the middle of a blizzard and they had 42 armed federal agents and USDA officials and they cleared out our entire barn.” 

Kristin Canty’s well-crafted documentary manages to fit more than 30 interviews into a taut, engaging, and ultimately enraging, 90-minute film. Among those interviewed is David Rana of Berkeley’s Three Stone Hearth food coop, the operators of Organic Pastures, a grass-fed dairy operation in Fresno, and the owner of Rawesome Foods in Venice, California. Farmageddon takes the big-picture message of the award-winning documentary Food Inc. and brings it closer to home — into the lives of small farmers victimized by government raids.

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Here is a clip of an armed U.S.D.A. raid which took place in L.A. back in 2011:

According to Gar Smith:

The pretext for the government’s assault on the Homeland, is a “war on raw milk,” ostensibly being waged “to protect the public.” (This bizarre enforcement obsession seems tragically misplaced given that more than two-thirds of the US population now suffers from obesity, diabetes and heart disease — preventable diseases largely linked to the consumption of processed, industrialized foods.) 

But the supposed risks of consuming natural raw milk from grass-fed cows appear to be wildly inflated. Canty reveals how “raw milk,” a human food staple that has been consumed for thousands of years, was demonized with the rise of the “pasteurization” process. (Ironically, pasteurization was popularized in the wake of a deadly mass-poisoning that was triggered not by small traditional dairy farmers but by the industrialized milk production of the mid-1800s. The milk that caused a mass-poisoning came from dairy cows crammed into dirty sheds next to a beer factory. Because their milk had a sickly hue, the owners of the company ordered that the milk be “whitened” —with chalk and flour.) 

The war on organic food is on.

Featured Image: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr